Name My Pain

Acute Ankle Injuries (Outside)
Name My Pain
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Lateral ligament injury (rolled ankle)
Occurs as a result of the athletes foot ‘rolling’ inwards, which can commonly occur when an athlete stands on another opponents foot, or the ball, or when they land from a jump or running on uneven surface. Very common in sports that involve running with changing direction at high speed.
The athlete or those around the athlete may hear a ‘crack’ or ‘snap’ or ‘tear’. Depending on the severity, the person may be able to continue exercising, or be limited to not be able to weight bear through the affected leg. Swelling and pain is usually immediate, and is most commonly on the outside and front of the ankle.

Pott’s fracture (ankle joint fracture)
Occurs as a result of the athletes foot ‘rolling’ outwards or inwards, which can commonly occur when an athlete stands on another opponents foot, or the ball, or when they land from a jump or running on uneven surface. Very common in sports that involve running with changing direction at high speed. Occurs generally with a lateral (outside) or medial (inside) ligament strain, and can be misdiagnosed as a severe ankle ligament tear, but is distinguished by severe pain on palpation to the ankle bones, and xray, or even foot deformity. Depending on the severity, the person may be able to continue exercising, or be limited to not be able to weight bear through the affected leg.
The athlete or those around the athlete may hear a ‘crack’ or ‘snap’ or ‘tear’. Swelling and pain is usually immediate and severe, and is most commonly on the inside or the outside of the ankle.
X-ray is best used for an acurate diagnosis.

Osteochondral fracture of the talar dome (bone cartilage fracture within the ankle joint)
Traditionally this presents as a normal ankle ligament strain as a result of the athletes foot ‘rolling’ outwards or inwards under compression, which can commonly occur when an athlete stands on another opponents foot, or the ball, or when they land from a jump or running on uneven surface. Very common in sports that involve running with changing direction at high speed. Occurs generally with a lateral (outside) or medial (inside) ligament strain, and can be misdiagnosed as a severe ankle ligament tear, but is distinguished by continual pain upon return to sport and exercise, deep within the ankle joint, as well a catching and locking type pain within the ankle.
The athlete or those around the athlete may hear a ‘crack’ or ‘snap’ or ‘tear’. Generally not able to weight bear through the affected leg. Swelling and pain is usually immediate and severe, and is most commonly on the inside or the outside of the ankle

Dislocation of the peroneal tendons
Generally presents in relation to a rolled ankle, where the ankle as a result of the athletes foot ‘rolling’ inwards, causes the retinaculum (tight band that holds all the structures tight in the ankle) to tear and cause the tendons to dislocate which can commonly occur when an athlete stands on another opponents foot, or the ball, or when they land from a jump or running on uneven surface. Common also in skiers, when they fall forward with their foot fixed in the ski boot.
Very common in sports that involve running with changing direction at high speed.
Depending on the severity, the person may be able to continue exercising, or be limited to not be able to weight bear through the affected leg. Swelling and pain is usually immediate, and is most commonly on the outside and front of the ankle,behind the ankle bone, where the appearance of the affected leg is different to that of the non affected.

Avulsion fracture of the base of the fifth metatarsal
This occurs as a result of rolling the ankle and the muscles kicking in to try and stop the foot from rolling, but as a result they cause a small piece of bone to break off the bone on the outside of the foot.
It presents as pain on the outside of the foot half way along the foot, with pain on walking and when the person tries to turn the foot outwards.
X-ray is the best tool to use for an sccurate dagnosis.


Sinus tarsi syndrome
This injury can occur either as a chronic overuse type injury where there is a biomechanical deficiency, but more commonly results from an acute rolled ankle, or a repetitively/recurrent rolled ankle due to loose ankle ligaments.
Pain is poorly localised, but most commonly described on the outside of the front of the foot. Where pain is more severe in the morning and decreases as the person warms the leg up, with activity or exercise.
Patient can also report pain on running a curve with affected leg on the inside, and a difficulty walking on uneven surfaces.
Often goes unnoticed and gets diagnosed as a straight forward ankle strain but continues to swell and be painful for a number of weeks afterwards.
Below is two trsted to perform to determne whether this is your injury diagnosis, where you perform forced passive eversion, or forced passive inversion which may reproduce pain.

Ankle Ankle
Forced passive eversion,hand pulls foot outwards, while foot is relaxed this will reproduce pain on the outside of the front of the foot. Forced passive inversion, hand pulls foot inwards, while foot is relaxed, this will also reproduce pain where indicated on the picture.
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